About your Search

20121006
20121014
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
a key issue the presidential campaign as the economy continues to falter. >> this country doesn't succeed when only the rich get richer. we succeed when the middle class gets bigger. >> rose: joseph stiglitz is a nobel prize winning economist. in his new book the price of inequality, how today's divided society endangers our future. he argues that a wealthy minority in this country has fed a vicious circle of growing inequality. i'm pleased to have joe stiglitz back at this table. welcome. >> nice to be here. >> rose: where do you think the american economy is today? and is it trending upwards? >> it's not really trending upward. i guess i would describe it as part of-- i call it a long slump, long malaise unless we do something. >> rose: right. >> you know there are two big gaps in our economy, relative to say 2007 before the crisis. one is real estate. real estate was the big sector, the bubble broke and now real-estate investment is half of what it was. no way that that is going to recover soon. the only good news is the houses were shodly onstructed and it may be 5 or 10 yea
're in a very slow economy. so i think that in this particular third-quarter earnings period the chance of a good surprise, a meaningful good surprise or a meaningful disappointment, it's pretty low. the street expects poor earnings comparison. that is what we're going to get. whether you are a couple percent decline or a couple percent gain. it's really not that much different. so it's looking ahead. remember earnings are a trailing indicator. >> so are we going to get a surprise or a disappointment you think from alcoa. everybody looks at this as setting thtone for trading as you mentioned. it will be the first dow component to report. it also when you look at the company, it has businesses in autos, aerospace, packaging, construction, so it is kind of a bellwether for the economy. what will those alcoa earnings tell us. >> well, alcoa reports first all the time, obviously. and i don't think that is a good idea to use that as a bellwether for earnings. think of the sector that alcoa is in. materials are going to have some was comparisons, really, energy and materials are going to be t
's helping the economy make a comeback. a "set back" for stocks, on investor jitters about the global economy. the major averages are now in negative territory for october. is this a buying opportunity or time to take profits? and toyota, once known for quality, announces yetnother major recall. does this make toyota less popular with consumers? that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! the nation's housing market appears to be building a new foundation. that's according to the latest snapshot of the u.s. economy released today by the federal reserve. the so-called "beige book" compiles data from 12 fed districts, and it shows residential real estate improved in "all" districts in september. anecdotes from business contacts and economists noted existg home sales strengthened, while prices rose or stayed stable. suzanne pratt takes a closer look at whether the broader economy is also showing signs of strength. >> reporter: here's a shocker: the u.s. economy is growing, but only at modest pace. that's what anecdotes, not hard numbers, from the fed's regional banks suggest about the business climate. 1
into the economy they are 12i78ity-- stimulating housing. citi has problem relating to housing. they are stimulating emerging markets where citi is the strongest. >> all right, let's take a look at some of your other picks besides citi. you like goldman sachs. you have been telling us this all year. and the regional bank suntrust. again, was's the attraction? >> suntrust again is in the southet. it has continuedto have credit problems later than a lot of the other banks. but that's been a bad thingment but now we think it's a good thing. because right now we can still see a lot of positive improvements as we start to see a pick up in the economy and housing and places like florida, can help move that stock back up. so we still like suntrust. >> we just have about 45$p)-sec. a new round of bank stress tests coming up. how do you think banks are going to do. are they strong enough to withstand a financial downturn? >> well, i think they're strong enough. the question is does the fed think they're strongnough. and that is what we will find out. i think it will be a tough time peri
is the first dow component to report earnings, and is considered a bellwether of how the economy is faring. the stock barely budged in the regular session, closing at $9.13 a share, and was up a few pennies after hours. we're happy to have with us now alcoa c.e.o. klaus kleinfeld. >> welcome back to nightly business report. baseed on how alcoa did in the third quarter, how do you think business will be for you for the rest of this year and going into 2013? >> well, it's a miktsed word out there. there's a lot of volatility. we see in the end markets that we confirm, the aluminum market is going to be about growth six percent. we took is down a notch from seven percent. as you just said, this is a decade where aluminum demand has doubled. there's high growth also here in the u.s. and we've seen that in the aerospace industry, very, very nice. we're seeing it in the u.s. automotive segment, very nice, and then there are on the other side -- i mean, coming down. we've seen the heavy truck segment coming down substantially, pretty much in the u.s., and building and constructions on the commerc
the latest look into the u.s. economy, and the latest fuel for the fight over economic policy in the presidential campaign. it was the kind of news that president obama hoped for, just over a month before the election and two days after a sub-par debate outing. >> more americans entered the work force, more people are getting jobs. >> brown: indeed, september's unemployment rate, calculated by a survey of households, fell to 7.8%. that's the lowest since the president took office. a second survey, of businesses, showed that employers added a net of 114,000 jobs, and job gains for july and august were revised upward by 86,000 the president touted the numbers in a campaign stop at george mason university in fairfax, virginia. >> now, every month reminds us that we've still got too many of our friends and neighbors who are looking for work. there are too many middle class families that are still struggling to pay the bills. they were struggling long before the crisis hit. but today's news certainly is not an excuse to try to talk down the economy to score a few political points.
mend a devastated europe after the second world war. but it's now the economy that has the e.u. facing one of its biggest crises yet. mounting debts, high unemployment, and austerity measures have triggered protests in some euro-zone nations. the economic woes he created deep rifts among countries using the joint currency, and raised questions about maintaining the euro and even their union. germany is the e.u.'s economic powerhouse. its chancellor, angela merkel, said the nobel peace prize shows the value of european unification. >> ( translated ): the euro is more than a currency because in the end it is foremost about the original idea, the idea of europe as a community of peace and values. >> suarez: but there were detractors, including those who said the e.u. hasn't dealt with an influx of immigrants. the director of amnesty international's branch that monitors the e.u. said he hopes the award would encourage the european union to be more open to refugees. >> suarez: the $1.2 million prize will be awarded in oslo on december 10. for a closer look at its successes and some of the o
very is the truth, but that is neither here nor there. >> on jobs, when the economy -- president said the economy created 5 million jobs, is that true? >> i do not know. these numbers are so squishy, it is not 100% clear to me who is right about jobs. when i know is what they were saying on friday morning when they released those numbers. for the first time, more people who were out of the work force were getting jobs, and that is news. >> it is also import to keep in mind who has been hard hit by the economy. largely younger americans, african-americans, and hispanics. either those who would not vote or are supporting president obama. so i think you have got a pool of swing voters out there who are actually doing better by now in this economy than many people. >> let us talk about entitlement. >> if you are around 60 or older, you do not need to listen any further, but for younger people, we did talk about what changes are occurring. >> if you are 55, you may want to listen. this will affect you. >> this is the debate over congressman ryan's plan to turn medicare into a voucher progr
to reform their economy. geithner meant with the indian finance minister in new delhi. >> i think the reforms outlined by the government of india offer very promising paths to improving growth outcomes for the indian economy. >> observers say geithner is urging the indian government to proceed with the economic reform policies. the prime minister has been trying to implement changes. one example is his push to open the retail sector to foreign supermarkets. plans to ease restrictions on foreign investment have sparked an angry reaction. one party has left the ruling coalition in protest. >>> now let's check on the markets. u.s. stock markets ended lower on tuesday as lingering uncertainties about the global economy led investors to sell shares. to see how stocks are trading this wednesday morning, let's go to ra mean at the tokyo stock exchange. the earnings season kicked off in the u.s. giving investors the jitters it seems. >> jitters indeed. we did see the dow trading lower but the nasdaq was the biggest loser after a brokerage down grade for intel which weighed on that tech he
together again to try to fd a way to keep the global economy from stalling. they're getting ready to meet in folk tokyo. their discussions are happening on the sidelines of the international monetary fund and world bank meetings. this is the first group of 7 meeting since april when ministers met in washington. they're trying to find ways to create steady growth despite europe's lingering debt crisis. representatives from eurozone countries are expected to look for support for the new rescue fund they launched monday. analysts say the global economy has been comparatively stable in recent months with financial rkets showing more solid movements but they warn china and other emerging economies are slowing down because of europe's problems. and those problems just seem to worsen day by day for eurozone members. a major u.s. ratings agency has downgraded spain's sovereign bonds. they're now just above junk territory. standard & poor's cut spain's credit rating by two notches, from bbb-plus to bbb-minus. only one notch above speculative status. they also point out a fear that worsening unempl
direction. look at where we are. the economy is barely limping along. it is growing at 1.3 percent. >> for a guy who says 47 percent of the american people are unwilling to take responsibility for their lives my friend recent y in a peach says 30 percent are takers, these people are my mom and dad, the people i grew up, and my neighbo, th pay more effective tax than governor romney pays in his federal income tax. >> their ideas are old and their ideas are bad and they eliminate the guarantee of medicare. >> that statistic was completely misleading but more importantly -- >> that's the facts. >> this is what politicians do when they don't have a record to run on. >> rose: joining me now in new york is rich lowry, editor of the "national review", from danville is mark halperin of time magazine, chuck todd of nbc news and from washington al hunt, executive editor of bloomberg news, joining us shortly from washington will be katty kay of the bbc world news america, gwen ifill of pbs and joining us in new york is john dickerson of nbc news and slate magazine, i am glad to have all of th
will slug it out on the economy, medicare and taxes. they may be number two on the ticket, but these men hope they can make this another crucial turning point in an election that is now almost a dd heat darren gersh reports. >> reporter: vice-presidential debates are often more entertaining than important, but not this time. joe biden will be trying to beat back the romney bump from the first presidential debate; and paul ryan will be working to stretch mitt romney's debate double into a home run. >> if ryan does really, really well, it could possibly fundamentally make this a real horse race, not just nationally but in the battleground states. so, i think there is a lot of expectation on both sides for what this debate possible could do. >> reporter: if you thought the first presidential debate was bogg down in stastics and policy details, you'll have more fun tonight. debate veterans are expecting fireworks. jeff nesbit was press secretary for former vice-president dan quayle. >> while both of them can go deep on wonky politics-- biden can go pretty deep on foreign policy and ryan can
this economy being crippled. the ayatollah sees that there are 50% fewer exports of oil. they see the currency going into the tank. he sees the economy going in a freefall. and he sees the world for the first time totally united in opposition to him getting a nuclear weapon. now with regard to bebe, he's been my friend for 39 years. the president has met with bebe a dozen times. he's spoken to benjamin netanyahu as much as he's spoken to anybody. the idea that we're not-- i was in, just before he went to the u.n. i was in a conference call with the president, with him talking to bebe for well over an hour. in stark relief n detail of what was going on. this is a bunch of stuff. look, here's the deal. >> what does that mean, a bunch of stuff. >> it means it's simply inaccurate. >> it's irish. >> it is, the irish call it malarkey. >> thanks for the translation. >> but last thing, the secretary of defense made it absolutely clear, he didn't walk anything back. we will not allow the iranians to get a nuclear weapon. what bebe held up there was, when they get to the point where they can enrich uran
on the economy. >> my whole passion is about helping the american people who are struggling right now. that's what this is about. the president says he's for middle class. how've they done under his presidency? not so well. i want to help the middle class get good jobs and better take- home pay. i know how to do that. >> sreenivasan: romney also underscored his anti-abortion stance after saying tuesday that he would not pursue abortion- related measures if he's elected. tod, he tolreporters, "i'll be a pro-life president." meanwhile, president obama spent the day at the white house. in an interview with radio host tom joyner, he said he's not surprised by the tightening polls. >> governor romney kept on making mistakes month after month so it made it looked artificially like this was, might end up being a cakewalk. but we understood internally that it never would be. that it was going to tight, it tightened over the last three or four days, but it could have tightened after the convention if they hadn't had such a bad convention. >> sreenivasan: t president also said he thinks he was just t
organized. >> rose: mexico's economy is doing how well now or how bad? >> well, doing well. i received today the report of july and again the economic growth was bigger than expected. 4.7 for july. >> rose: we'd take that here. >> that's good. let me tell you, we suffered a lot in the economic recession, 2009. >> rose: right. >> however, mexican economy expanded almost 16% since the second semester of 2009. so we had like 13 quarters in a row growing and generating like 700,000 new jobs in the formal sector which is very good for mexico. and i think that finally the economy is becoming very, very competitive. let me give you a couple of examples. when i took office six years ago mexico was the 9th largest exporter of vehicles in the world. and today we are the fourth largest exporter of vehicles in the world. so we are, for instance, the first exporter of flat screen and it's becoming a very, very good economy. and it's not only that we are very close to the united states which is clearly an advantage, but also we are investing a lot of infrastructure and in a very important thing, charlie,
are going to do exactly what they did before. believe me, it wasn't the economy that got that huge surge, sometimes 20 and 30 points. it was the economy, to be sure, plus women's issues. >> so don't you think your analysis defies the ideas of women's issues if women were responding to a discussion that didn't include what you're calling women's issues? women are looking at a whole slate of issues and are concerned -- >> the candidates didn't bring it up, and because the candidates didn't bring it up, a lot of women who had never been paying attention the to donates didn't even know about his position. >> i hope that actually romney has an opportunity to clarify what his visions actually are, like you said 1 unfiltered because ther this war on women fartive has hurt him up until now and he needs to be clear about this. >> can anybody be clear about it if he's not clear about it or if he keeps training it? it's one of those john kerry i was before it and now i'm against it. >> that's his challenge. i mean, mitt romney has to overcome his reputation as being a flip-flopper. that is was one
are the priority issues as you see them in the hispanic community for this election? >> jobs and the economy is the number one issue. immigration, like we said, is the issue that moves the latino vote. >> what's the unemployment -- >> inspires them to vote. unemployment rate among latinos is 10.2%. >> it's been about 11% during the obama's presidency. but for latinos, the symbolic issue is immigration or else it's personal. it's not like an abstract issue. it's personal. either we are immigrants or we know someone who's an immigrant or we work with someone or our neighbor an immigrant. it's not abstract. it's very personal. >> why do so many anglos seem to resent hispanic immigrants more than they do others? >> i think that there's a couple of things there. i think that there's a certain feel of because there's the community that's growing so fast, they're sort of like a threat that our way of life is going to change and i don't think that they see immigrants as part of america. and, you know, the funny thing is the majority of hispanic -- well, all hispanic voters are u.s. citizens of cours
on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the former football coach who plunged penn state university into scandal by his sexual abuse of young boys over many years was sentenced today. the judge called his crime a "story of betrayal." jerry sandusky wore a red jail jump suit and a smile as he entered the center county courthouse this morning, less than two hours later, the sle was gone after the 68-year-old learned he will likely spend the rest of his life in prison. lead prosecutor. >> i believe that the sentence that the court imposed today was a wise and proper one and that it reflectedded the seri
and economically. lithuania had to make the leap to aarket economy and delop ne sources of ince. the koreans that, for instance, was great for tourism, but a legal fight today shows lithuanians still has a long way to go in its attempt to shake off the coast from its post- soviet past. >> a summer paradise could soon become a nightmare. she practices piano as her parents said in a garden. 10 years ago, the family made her lifelong wish come true. they built a summer home on the crony and spit. now, the wood frame house is to be torn down. authorities say it was built illegally. >> we had all the permits when we bought the house. signatures from every relevant authority -- the notaries and the bank checked it all. we had to get a mortgage using our assets as collateral. five years ago, we suddenly received news that there was a court case against us. >> other homeowners are suffering a similar fate. the homes are nearly all new, and all had building permits, which is not always the case in lithuania. apparently, the authorities allowed construction on land that should never have been developed. th
almost entirely about jobs and the economy. now we've had a u.s. ambassador murdered in libya. there's been general... much more attention to foreign policy. i think we had good jobs numbers as well. remember that. >> warner: last friday. the romney campaign is looking to go where the ducks are. at this moment the economic numbers are good for the white house but there's more and more controversy about foreign policy and leadership. >> warner: what would you add to that, susan? did they see this as an opportunity to be seized? >> i think the romney camp understands he needs to be seen as a credible commander in chief if he's going to be elected president. there's a bar he needs to get over. i don't think they're going to stick on this issue much it's pretty clear that even though foreign policy has risen a bit and even though there was an opening because of the white house's changing explanation of the attacks in benghazi that killed our ambassador that this election is ging be prosecuted on the economy. that is the topic that i think we will turn back to for most of the remaining w
. so what happened was extraordinary change in society because of changes in business and the economy and technology and i had a front row seat for 20 years watching this. >> rose: lessons of geography, a new movie and a life stephen shepard lived in journalism when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: robert kaplan is here, he is chief geopolitical analyst and has been writing about foreign affairs for 25 years. in his latest book he says to better understand global issues we must look to a map. he examines how geography has influenced the balance of world power and how it can inform foreign policy in the future. it is called "the revenge of geography." i'm pleased to have him back on this program. welcome. >> rose: >> a pleasure to be here, charlie. >> rose: henry kissinger said-- and you put this at the top-- that "robert kaplan's research shines light on an ancient truth. geography has been the predominant factor in determinesing the fate of nations, from fay roenic egypt to the arab sprg." how l
stagnant. these are issues that affect them. the economy, things dealing with like family values that are important. the issue of immigration as well. part of them figuring out how can i get my voice heard. >> just simple to say -- >> maybe the same message that you want for all americans but you have to target the demographic where they live rather than have separate targeted message as if they're a special group way over here. >> sometimes politicians miss it. we compartmentalize people. >> it is important for us to speak to people in a way that they can understand and on issues that are important. >> that's exactly what happened -- >> that's exaly what happened during the debate. that both of the -- the forum that they had, both of of the candidates talked to them, the hosts were talking in spanish asking the questions that the community wanted to know and able to answer have them open conversation to the latino community that's really what you need to do. >> i got to tell you i've never heard, i listen to conservative radio all the time they talk more about that union vision
was similarly savvy. he believed that national security came from a good economy, that that was the most important thing you could do, other than having -- >> rose: exactly what barack obama said at west point? >> right. and was right. but eisenhower kept his eye on that ball, and he knew that the pentagon was going to exaggerate and hype the threat because he had been a genal andhe knew that is -- >> rose: but there were moments in which people thought he should have shown more courage. >> there were. on civil rights he did not use the bully pulpit as well as he should have. >> rose: richard nixon said he was devious. >> yes. you can have in great quote that eisnehower was a more devious man than people realized and i mean that in the best sense of the word. and he was being sincere and wasn't being funny it is true, eisenhower was deef you in the best sense of the word. >> rose: devious in what way? >> well, he wouldplay dumb is one thi i love about the guy guy talkable about his confidence, once before a conference his aides are coming and saying mr. president you have to be careful,
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)